U.S. chicken is farmed and processed to the highest standards. U.S. legislation prohibits hormones and preemptive antibiotics, and supports the most advanced breeding and feeding methods to ensure that chickens reaching U.S. processing facilities are large, healthy and high quality birds.

Hormones are not used to raise chickens, only antibiotics are provided to the birds to prevent disease, and are used only when necessary under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian. U.S. chicken farmers make it a top priority to raise healthy, top quality chickens using national animal welfare guidelines and audit checklists. These guidelines cover every phase of the chicken's life and offers science-based recommendations for humane treatment.

U.S. poultry processing facilities are among the best in the world, with federal regulators permanently on site at every facility to control hygiene, test for contamination and monitor the cold chain to ensure that all domestic and export products meet global safety and quality standards. Highly trained U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) inspectors maintain the highest quality in the world.

Why are U.S. chickens so big?

The chickens that end up on most dinner tables today have been carefully selected and bred to produce birds that will best thrive in today's modern poultry facilities. As a result, these birds are a much healthier and faster-growing stock than the chickens of a few years ago. And contrary to some myths, growth-enhancing additives such as hormones or steroids are never used and no chickens are genetically modified. The U.S. National Chicken Council points out: “There are no GMO chickens commercially available, period.”

For information about U.S. chicken breeding, visit the U.S. National Chicken Council (NCC) site

U.S. chicken is farmed and processed to the highest standards. U.S. legislation prohibits hormones and preemptive antibiotics, and supports the most advanced breeding and feeding methods to ensure that chickens reaching U.S. processing facilities are large, healthy and high quality birds.

Hormones are not used to raise chickens, only antibiotics are provided to the birds to prevent disease, and are used only when necessary under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian. U.S. chicken farmers make it a top priority to raise healthy, top quality chickens using national animal welfare guidelines and audit checklists. These guidelines cover every phase of the chicken's life and offers science-based recommendations for humane treatment.

U.S. poultry processing facilities are among the best in the world, with federal regulators permanently on site at every facility to control hygiene, test for contamination and monitor the cold chain to ensure that all domestic and export products meet global safety and quality standards. Highly trained U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) inspectors maintain the highest quality in the world.

Why are U.S. chickens so big?

The chickens that end up on most dinner tables today have been carefully selected and bred to produce birds that will best thrive in today's modern poultry facilities. As a result, these birds are a much healthier and faster-growing stock than the chickens of a few years ago. And contrary to some myths, growth-enhancing additives such as hormones or steroids are never used and no chickens are genetically modified. The U.S. National Chicken Council points out: “There are no GMO chickens commercially available, period.”

For information about U.S. chicken breeding, visit the U.S. National Chicken Council (NCC) site